2014 Wind Turbine Buyer's Guide: Page 2 of 6

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Wind Turbine Buyer’s Guide
Wind Turbine Buyer’s Guide
Bergey Excel 6
Bergey Excel 6
Bergey Excel 1
Bergey Excel 1
Bergey Excel 10
Bergey Excel 10
Endurance E-3120
Endurance E-3120
Eocycle
Eocycle
Evance R9000
Evance R9000
Gaia-Wind
Gaia-Wind
Kestrel e300i
Kestrel e300i
Kestrel e400nb
Kestrel e400nb
Kingspan KW6
Kingspan KW6
Kingspan KW3
Kingspan KW3
Northern Power Systems 100-24
Northern Power Systems 100-24
Sonkyo Windspot 3.5
Sonkyo Windspot 3.5
Ventera VT10
Ventera VT10
Wind Turbine Buyer’s Guide
Bergey Excel 6
Bergey Excel 1
Bergey Excel 10
Endurance E-3120
Eocycle
Evance R9000
Gaia-Wind
Kestrel e300i
Kestrel e400nb
Kingspan KW6
Kingspan KW3
Northern Power Systems 100-24
Sonkyo Windspot 3.5
Ventera VT10

Endurance Wind Power - endurancewindpower.com

(EWP) is among the world’s largest manufacturers of small- and medium-sized grid-tied wind turbines. Founded in 2007 and headquartered outside of Vancouver, Canada, the company has a global installed base of more than 600 turbines. EWP manufactures turbines in the 50 to 225 kW range in Canada and the U.K. This privately held company is 40% owned by its employees, who share a long-term commitment to the products and the people who invest in them.

The first EWP turbines were 5 kW S-series machines, designed by David Laino and Dean Davis of Windward. The company started growing rapidly when it purchased a larger machine from Energie-PGE of Quebec, re-engineered it, and began building the 50 kW E-3120—first for the United States in 2009, and then for the U.K. in 2010. Cofounder and principal engineer David Laino says, “We don’t merely assemble turbines, we try to deliver products that are designed to work with the people associated with them, whether it’s the owner, installer, neighbor, or investor.”

Eocycle Technologies - eocycle.com

Founded in 2001, Eocycle Technologies has been a pioneer in developing permanent-magnet electric generator and motor solutions based on the transverse flux topology. Eocycle’s generators and motors are well-suited for a variety of low-speed, high-torque applications in diverse markets, including wind turbines. For the past several years, Eocycle has focused on developing and fabricating a 25 kW direct-drive wind turbine for grid-tied wind energy applications.

The privately owned company’s first three-bladed production unit went into service in January 2012, and there was a two-bladed version prototyped for almost two years. The company has produced 12 units to date. Eric Lafleur, director of sales and marketing, says that the machine offers a “combination of dependable energy production, minimal maintenance, and very quiet operation under all weather conditions.”

Evance - evancewind.com

British Evance was founded in 1999 by four engineers who had developed a 300 kW turbine, and took what they had learned to develop the Iskra AT-5 5 kW turbine, which was refined to become the Evance R9000. Evance is a privately owned limited corporation with key investors.

Evance has installations in the United Kingdom and Europe, the United States, and Australasia, with a network of resellers and installers around the world. The first 5 kW turbine model was launched in 2004, with the R9000 (latest model) launched in 2009.

More than 1,800 Evance turbines have been installed, and the machine is available in on- and off-grid configurations. Darrin Russell, Evance’s support coordinator for the Americas, reports that  “every turbine installed is still in the field operating, and that the patented reactive-pitch blades with a steel shaft running the entire length of the blades has resulted in zero blade failures.”

Comments (5)

Robert Dee_2's picture

Ian,
Your leading statement for this article is right on.

I love these HP cover shots showing people strapped to an 80 foot tower while a crane, probably another twenty feet over their heads, drops several hundred pounds of metal on them. Why anyone thinks this is glamorous is completely beyond me. It's dangerous, expensive, takes a lot of real estate and is so much more involved than PV today that I think for all but the very few with unlimited time and expenses wind is a no. This picture, if anything, should tell people capable of looking past the glamour to pass wind by.

Yes, I know the arguments about how wind compliments PV but at what cost? At an extreme wind velocity of 11m/s the small Kestrel puts out 1Kw according to your comparison sheet. Today that's three PV modules at a fraction of the cost with little or no maintenance and 30 plus years of output with a 25 year warranty not the 5 year one Kestrel offers.

And why are manufacturers publishing 11 m/s output, who has that kind of wind? It's unrealistic and a sad commentary on an industry that can't compete in the alternate energy business outside of large scale commercial turbines.
How is anyone realistically justifying wind? At $5,544.00 for the kestrel, without the tower and yearly maintenance, it's simply not feasible today.

Sorry, if anything this issue only confirms my belief that wind has very little place in small scale energy production.

Ian Woofenden's picture

Hi Robert,

Small wind is not for the faint of heart. I talk most of my clients out of it, especially as PV cost is decreasing. You have to either have a _great_ wind resource, an off-grid system with a dark and windy season, or a strong desire to just do it for it to make sense. It is a total blast (if you like that sort of thing) to install and keep a system running, but it's not cheap, easy, or reliable.

One of the presenters at the upcoming Small Wind Conference is doing a presentation titled "Go Big or Go Home", and I think there's a lot of sense to that. The economics and the quality of the equipment both improve as you get into small commercial machines. With the little machines, the cost of the tower to actually get it up into a good resource becomes a pretty big hurdle.

"Wind complements PV" is primarily a reasonable approach off-grid. On-grid, it's generally wiser to look at your resources and sink your money into generating with the most reliable and abundant, be that sun, wind, or falling water. With net metering, there's little need to have your generating source producing evenly all year. You can actually make all of your energy in your sunny season, and lean on your credit with the utility in other seasons.

As far as the 11 m/s, I agree that it's too high for a rating, but it's important to be clear that this is an instantaneous wind speed, NOT an average. And really, _any_ instantaneous rating is pretty useless -- for comparison with PV, comparison with other machines, and for energy predictions. What's really needed is an energy rating at various average wind speeds, as shown in the article table. Then you can (with luck...) find the average wind speed at tower-top height on your site and get a prediction of the kilowatt-hours a given machine may provide.

You are wise to point out that the turbine cost is just one piece of the _system_ cost. Typically, it's a modest fraction, with tower and balance of systems (BOS) each costing more than the turbine in most cases. Potential wind energy users need good pricing on installed cost of all components together before deciding to go for it. And some will go for it regardless of the economics, just as we decide to buy a new Prius, or a Caribbean cruise, a few years in college, or a week on the Riviera. In all cases, it's wise to know the costs and the benefits.

Ian Woofenden, Home Power senior editor

Robert Dee_2's picture

Ian,
Well put, you know wind better than most of us.
I also know the 'lure' of wind, the darn thing looks so easy just spinning around up there! And there certainly is a joy factor. I'm not saying I won't invest in it, I probably will but I already have over 10kw of PV in and a stream for microhydro. The thing that scares me is that we have this monster called the API (American Petroleum Institute) doing everything they can to knock down alternate energy, which actually beats the pants off of every other energy source out there in the long run, and I want things on the table to keep the disappointment factor as low as possible. We need to be the most honest guys out there or we'll get hammered.
I just heard the other day that Germany made 74% of its power from alternate energy (Thank you Hermann Scheer... RIP) and India is pushing solar now. Great! Technology will win over and we have that on our side.
Keep up the good work!
Robert

David Bainbridge's picture

I installed a Kestrel turbine last year and you immediately notice the much higher quality design and attention to detail. I had an African Wind Power turbine that was also produced in Africa which pales in comparison to the Kestrel. The support is also top-notch. I've emailed and gotten response to my questions in a timely manner.

Ian Woofenden's picture

Glad to hear it, David! I've been well impressed with the Kestrels I've put my hands and wrenches on, but have never lived with one, though I'd like to.

Kestrel has the distinct advantage over African Wind Power that they have significant financial backing. The AWP was a good original design, but the company was a bit thin, as was the U.S. importer.

Small wind is a hard business to be in, and I applaud Kestrel for making what seem to be good products, and taking care of their customers.

Ian Woofenden, Home Power senior editor

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