MAIL: Question Authority

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Sun on the desert horizon
Some people rightfully dread becoming helpless consumers of overpriced solar power from state-subsidized solar power plants.

The discussion of energy in “The RE Right of Way on Public Lands” in HP154 is confused. We can use the sun without converting it to electricity. The renewable portfolio standard and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) forget this. The false choice—”either coal or solar power plants”—plays into the hands of our notorious “1%.” Listen to John Batisky for the Quechuan Tribe (page 12 in the aforementioned article) or many other serious students of energy—we need to conserve electricity. Clotheslines, daylighting, solar water heaters, and passive heating and cooling—these strategies use the sun directly and economically, and can replace power plants and transmission lines.

The electric lobby and its stakeholders must be questioned. Whenever I read “stakeholder,” I think “crony.” Might the immense lies of the state unravel if we use the sun ourselves—off grid? Some people rightfully dread becoming helpless consumers of overpriced solar power from state-subsidized solar power plants.

In California during Governor Jerry Brown’s first administration, conservation and passive cooling were successfully demonstrated. Why, today, do politicians recommend that citizens neglect nature and the sun on their own properties, yet crave the sun expensively converted to electricity at an alien solar power plant?

Steve Baer • Zomeworks Corp.

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